Out with the old…

Caravaggio, Thomas

Caravaggio, The Incredulity of St Thomas

It has been just a bit more than 10 years since I started blogging. I don’t much like change, but after all that time my old blogging platform had become cranky and unreliable. So I threw out the BandAids and moved to WordPress. That move has allowed me to fix things that were broken, add some new features, and, with the help of the talented Thomas Rubarth of Fineline Graphics, AnotherThink now has a fresh look.

The image in the new banner is called The Incredulity of St. Thomas by Caravaggio, painted about 1601. St. Thomas is also known as “doubting Thomas,” because John reports (John 20:24) that Thomas refused to believe in the risen Christ until he could touch the wounds in his side and hands for himself. Jesus gave him that opportunity, and Thomas believed.

Doubt is a consistent theme in what I’ve written over the years, and it has been humanity’s primary challenge to faith since the days of Jesus. We each have to decide who we think Jesus was and how we will respond to him. On these pages I hope to encourage you to have another think about what you believe, what you know — or think you know — about Jesus Christ.

For my mother, who is one of my most loyal fans, there is now a little green button at the end of each post that will print a copy of these essays. That same button will also let you email a copy to a friend. At the top of each post are the usual social networking buttons, should you want to alert your friends to some heresy I’ve written. The comment mechanism works better under WordPress, so tell me what’s on your mind. Besides the usual RSS feeds, you can also sign up to be notified by email each time I post something new.

Thanks for your continuing support for AnotherThink. May the Lord give us all wisdom as we seek him.

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Comments

  1. Hey Charlie

    Great that you’ve joined us over here on WPress. I moved a couple of years back and found the new experience hugely better than my previous platform.

    Shalom
    John (UK)

  2. Phyllis Bridges says:

    Great Char and I hope I’ve signed up to be notified by e-mail every time you post a new “Think” Your devoted Other Mother

  3. Bob Bridges says:

    Mom pointed me to this issue, and after I replied it occurred to me I may as well say it here, too:

    “…unlike many Christians, I really LIKE doubting Thomas. Not because he refused to believe what his friends had told him—he got a mild rebuke over that—but because he said what he was thinking, instead of just going along with it and doubting secretly. There’s a man I can work with, and trust, and appreciate, even when I don’t agree with him. And, of course, sometimes I’ll agree with him too.”

    • I agree, Bob. He was honest about his doubts, and that tells us a lot about his character. And, when he finally got the chance to see Jesus again, his response was “My Lord and my God,” which is about as unequivocal a statement of faith as one can make.

  4. I discovered your site through CMSCrawler.com, which notes when a blogger changes platforms.

    I have to say that I represent the Movable Type community and we are sorry to see you go. It always amazes me how much effort people put into switching platforms. If you put half that effort into fixing your site’s problems, you could have done it.

    I hope that you and your site continue on to greater success.

    • Thanks for your comment, Dave. There is certainly some truth to what you say — the conversion was far more laborious than I had imagined. Some of that can be blamed on some undetected server issues, which slowed down both MT and WP performance, and which I had erroneously blamed on MT. MT is a fine platform that has served me well. That said, I’ve been able to make some improvements under WP, and despite the effort involved, it’s been worth it.

  5. The new design looks great!

Comment Policy:  All comments are subject to moderation. Your words are your own, but AnotherThink is mine, so I reserve the right to censor language that is uncouth or derogatory. No anonymous comments will be published, but if you include your real name and email address (kept private), you can say pretty much whatever is on your mind. I look forward to hearing from you.

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